Iowa County News

Youth Education Opportunities


Attention Iowa County Educators and Youth Leaders:

The Iowa County Land Conservation Department is accepting entries for the 2020 WI Land + Water Youth Poster Contest.

The 2020 National Poster Contest theme is: “Where would we BEE without Pollinators.” Poster sizes can be 12x18 or 14x22. Find the attached entry form (parental signature required).https://wisconsinlandwater.org/files/events/2020_NACD_Poster_Contest_Theme.jpg

The Conservation Poster contest is open to kindergarten through twelfth

 grade students and posters are evaluated on the following criteria:

  • Conservation message
  • Visual effectiveness
  • Originality
  • Universal appeal
  • Individual artwork

Students compete at the county level, then the 1st place posters move on to area competitions and the winners at those move on to the State Competition in March at the WI Land + Water’s Annual conference. The 1st place posters from the state competition represent Wisconsin at the National Association of Conservation Districts annual meeting. Posters are judged in their respective grade levels: K-1; 2-3; 4-6; 7-9; 10-12. Awards will be given to 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners.

The deadline to submit posters will be December 20th.

Posters can be mailed to or dropped off at the Iowa County Land Conservation Department; 1124 Professional Drive, Dodgeville. If several students are participating, call Sarah at 608-930-9894 to coordinate to poster pick up at the school.

More information about the poster contest can be found on the WI Land + Water Website at the following link: https://wisconsinlandwater.org/events/youth-poster-speaking-contest

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Other Education Opportunities:

The Conservation Speech Contest aims to promote the conservation of natural resources and the protection or enhancement of environmental quality. Emphasis is placed on the subject as it relates to the locality or to Wisconsin. Students compete at county then area competitions with the winners moving on to the State Competition in March at the WI Land + Water’s Annual conference. The first place winners in each category share their speeches at the conference luncheon. Please contact the Iowa County LCD if students are interested in participating in the Speech competition.

In addition to the contests, Iowa County is interested in assembling a team or teams for the 2020 Envirothon. Teams of 5 students from middle or high school will compete at the state Envirothon on Friday, April 17, 2020 at Wisconsin Lions Camp in Rosholt, WI. The team will be tested on several aspects of natural resources (Forestry, Soils & Land Use, Aquatic Ecology, and Wildlife). In addition, teams create group presentations based on a pre-selected, topical conservation issue that local conservation professionals are dealing with across the state. Winners advance to the North American Envirothon/Regional Envirothon to compete for scholarships and prizes. Each team will need an advisor, generally a teacher, FFA leader, 4-H leader or parent. If you have interested students but no advisor, contact the Sarah Hovis at Iowa County Land Conservation Department to discuss options. For more information visit the following links: https://wisconsinlandwater.org/events/envirothon

https://envirothon.org/the-competition/current-competition/


Don't Let the Flu Stop Fall Fun


Don't Let the Flu Stop Fall Fun

State Health Department urges people to get vaccinated against the flu

The excitement of returning to school, going to local football games, and other fall activities will soon be followed by the flu season, and health officials are encouraging people to schedule their flu vaccines now to protect themselves, their children, elderly relatives, and their communities.

“The flu can be dangerous for many people, including pregnant women, young children, people age 65 and older, and others whose immune systems aren’t working well,” said Jeanne Ayers, State Health Officer and Division of Public Health Administrator. “Getting your flu vaccine protects you and so many others in your community, and helps prevent missed school or work.”

View the entire news release.


DHS Lead Abatement Program Receives Federal Approval


DHS Lead Abatement Program Receives Federal Approval

Efforts will improve housing conditions for low-income children and pregnant women 

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) announced today they received approval from the Centers of Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to implement a health services initiative to provide lead abatement services in the homes of low-income children and pregnant women enrolled in BadgerCare Plus and Medicaid. Governor Tony Evers’ budget invested $14.2 million in lead testing and abatement and $2 million for the new Lead-Safe Homes Program.

“This is a great step toward my goal to ‘get the lead out’ of Wisconsin homes so that our families, and most of all our kids, don’t have to worry about lead poisoning and the long term health and learning affects that come with it,” said Governor Evers.

View the entire news release.


New Data Analysis Shows Impact of Suicide in Wisconsin


New Data Analysis Shows Impact of Suicide in Wisconsin

 Wisconsin's updated suicide prevention plan will be released later this year

Today, Suicide Prevention Day, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) released findings from its most recent analysis of state suicide deaths and suicide-related injury. This analysis is part of an effort to update Wisconsin’s suicide prevention plan and reduce the number of suicide attempts and deaths. 

This analysis found:

  • The state’s suicide rate rose 40% between 2000 and 2017.
  • From 2013-2017, suicide rates in Wisconsin were highest among individuals ages 45-54.
  • Of all state deaths by firearm from 2013-2017, 71% were suicide deaths.
  • In 2017, the majority of individuals who died by suicide in Wisconsin were male.
  • In 2017, suicide was the second leading cause of death among adolescents in Wisconsin.

View the entire news release.

Reporters covering this issue are encouraged to review the Recommendations for Reporting on Suicide for important guidance on ways to communicate suicide. 


Majority of Wisconsin Lung Disease Patients Who Reported Vaping Cite THC Products


In the Wisconsin investigation of people with lung disease who reported vaping, 89% of the 27 cases interviewed so far reported using e-cigarettes or other vaping devices to inhale THC products, such as waxes and oils, the Wisconsin Department of Health Services announced today. THC is the active ingredient in marijuana. While most cases have reported vaping THC products, DHS is  continuing to investigate all possible causes. The connection to THC products is based on interviews with cases, and the agency is working with FDA to determine the contents of used vaping products.

“Vaping cartridges containing THC may include chemicals or additives that are unknown, unregulated, and unsafe,” said Department of Health Services Secretary-designee Andrea Palm. “We strongly urge people not to vape.”

View the entire news release.


SWIGG Study Update


MADISON 
Embargoed until August 1, 2019 at 9:00 AM. 
Contacts: 
Mark Borchardt, Mark.Borchardt@ARS.USDA.GOV, 715-387-4943  
Joel Stokdyk, jstokdyk@usgs.gov, 715-384-9673 
Ken Bradbury, ken.bradbury@wisc.edu, 608-263-7921 
Iowa County: Katie Abbott, Katherine.Abbott@iowacounty.org, 608-930-9893 
Grant County: Lynda Schweikert, Lynda.Schweikert@wi.nacdnet.net, 608-723-6377 #4 Lafayette County: Terry Loeffelholz, Terry.Loeffelholz@lafayettecountywi.org, 608-776-3836 
SWIGG Study Update – Identifying Sources of Fecal Contamination in Private Wells in Lafayette, Grant, and Iowa Counties 
MADISON — The Southwest Wisconsin Groundwater and Geology Study of Grant, Iowa, and Lafayette Counties has entered its second phase: identifying fecal sources of contamination in homeowners’ private wells. Samples were collected in mid-April 2019 from 35 private wells. Wells were randomly selected from those previously found during the study to be contaminated with coliform bacteria or high nitrate (above the drinking water standard of 10 ppm).  
Samples were analyzed for pathogens and non-pathogenic microorganisms. The types of microorganisms present can indicate sources of fecal contamination such as human wastewater and livestock manure. 
Homeowners received results letters this week, and each county’s conservation department is being provided an update. 
Contamination of fecal origin was observed in 32 of 35 wells (91%). There was evidence of both human and livestock fecal contamination of wells, including both cattle and swine manure. The researchers emphasize that the percentage of positive wells from this sampling event is not indicative of a region-wide contamination rate because the sampling focused on wells that had previously shown contamination. 
Microorganisms capable of causing illness were also detected, including Salmonella, rotavirus group A, adenovirus, and enterovirus. However, the researchers caution the data only report microorganism detection rates and cannot be easily translated to estimates of health risk. 
The percentage of wells that test positive is expected to differ as weather and land use change over time, and it’s too soon to assess which contamination source is more prevalent.  Contamination sources are expected to vary seasonally. For example, in Kewaunee County contamination by human wastewater was more common in early spring when groundwater levels were high, while bovine contamination was more common in fall, after manure had been applied. 
Tests only identify fecal sources of contamination, like wastewater and manure, and do not capture other potential contaminants or sources of contamination, like fertilizers. 

Different wells will be randomly selected for future sampling rounds. The next round is scheduled for early August.  
The research team will also carry out geologic studies and analyze well construction practices in the three-county region, with the goal of determining correlations between water quality, geology, and well construction. 
According to Ken Bradbury, Director and State Geologist at the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey-University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension, groundwater conditions in southwest Wisconsin differ from those in eastern Wisconsin, and in particular from Kewaunee County, where similar studies were previously conducted. In both areas, wells draw groundwater from aquifers, or water-bearing rocks, composed of fractured dolomite, a type of limestone. In Kewaunee County there is a single dolomite aquifer, but in southwestern Wisconsin there can be as many as three separate aquifers at different depths below the ground surface, each with different water quality.  “Before we can completely interpret the results of water sampling, we need to determine the depth and construction of each well sampled so that we can understand the source of water for that well,” said Bradbury. 
The study was initiated by Grant, Iowa, and Lafayette Counties in collaboration with researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey-UW-Madison Division of Extension, and the U.S. Geological Survey. Support for the study comes from the counties and agencies involved as well as other organizations, including the Lafayette Ag Stewardship Alliance and the Iowa County Uplands Watershed Group. 


Update on the Southwest Wisconsin Groundwater and Geology Study August 1,2019


Update on the Southwest Wisconsin Groundwater and Geology Study August 1,2019

The Southwest Wisconsin Groundwater and Geology (SWIGG) study aims to better understand the quality of groundwater accessed by private wells in Grant, Iowa, and Lafayette Counties, specifically as related to potential contamination from nitrate and microbiological contaminants. The overall goal is to provide data that can identify issues and guide potential solutions.

Current Objectives

  1. Evaluate private well contamination using indicator bacteria (total coliform and E. coli) and nitrate based on randomized synoptic sampling events,
  2. Identify the source of contamination in a subset of total coliform- and nitrate-positive wells once per season using microbial tests that distinguish between human, bovine, and swine fecal sources.

The first objective was completed through two synoptic (“snapshot”) sampling events (November 9-10, 2018 and April 12-13, 2019) that tested a total of 840 samples from randomly selected wells across the three-county region. Overall, 42% (November) and 27% (April) of sampled wells had evidence of contaminated groundwater (See Table 1).

Table 1. Percentage of wells positive for total coliform, E. coli, and high nitrate* for two sampling events.

  November event (301 wells tested)                                                         

  April event (539 wells tested)                                                                

County

Total coliform

E. coli

High Nitrate*

Total coliform or High

Nitrate*

Total coliform

E.

coli

High Nitrate*

Total coliform or High

Nitrate*

Grant

38

7

12

43

14

1

14

25

Iowa

26

3

13

33

14

1

13

25

Lafayette

40

3

27

55

23

4

21

36

All

34

4

16

42

16

2

15

27

3

 
*High nitrate exceeds the health standard of NO --N > 10 mg/L

The first of four sampling events for objective two was completed in April 9-13, 2019. Thirty-five wells were randomly selected from those previously testing positive for total coliform bacteria or with nitrate that exceeded the drinking water standard (10 mg/L). Samples were analyzed for pathogens and non-pathogenic microorganisms capable of distinguishing human wastewater and livestock manure (“microbial source tracking”). We sent homeowners their results this week; all participants will remain confidential.

We detected contamination of fecal origin in 32 of 35 wells, including microorganisms that indicate human wastewater (30 wells), cattle manure (17 wells), and swine manure (5 wells; see Table 2). We also detected microorganisms capable of causing illness in 13 wells; we will call these homeowners to provide more information.

Table 2. Results from the first round of well testing for pathogens and microbial source tracking. Only organisms we detected are listed; see complete list in Table 3.

Microbe group

Microorganism

No. Positive Wells

Human-specific pathogens

Cryptosporidium hominis

1

Human adenovirus groups A-F

2

Human enterovirus

1

Human or livestock pathogens

Cryptosporidium parvum

2

Cryptosporidium spp.

4

Rotavirus group A (NSP3 gene)

3

Rotavirus group A (VP7 gene)

1

Salmonella (invA gene)

7

Salmonella (ttr gene)

5

Human wastewater

Bacteroidales-like Hum M2

6

Human Bacteroides

29

Bovine manure

Bovine polyomavirus

1

Ruminant Bacteroides

16

Swine manure

Pig-1-Bacteroidales

3

Pig-2-Bacteroidales

3

Pathogen*

13

Any microorganism*

32

*The value for Pathogen and Any microorganism are less than the sum of individual microorganisms because some wells were positive for more than one microorganism.

The evidence of fecal material from both human and livestock sources is clear from these data, but there is not a straight-forward step from these results to health risk. We expect the percentage of wells that test positive to differ in subsequent sampling events because weather and land use change over time. We emphasize that it’s too soon to assess which contamination source (septic systems or livestock) is more prevalent. Finally, our tests only identify fecal sources of contamination, like wastewater and manure, and do not capture other potential contaminants or sources of contamination, like fertilizers.

Different wells will be randomly selected for the next sampling rounds. The next round is scheduled for August. The temporal component of the study design is important to capture a full picture of groundwater quality and factors related to contamination.

As part of the study we will assess well construction and geological characteristics (e.g., well age, depth to bedrock) that affect total coliform and nitrate contamination. We are currently locating well construction reports for sampled wells to compile well characteristics. We will begin the statistical analyses after the sampling campaign is completed.

The Southwest Wisconsin Groundwater and Geology study is a collaborative effort among Grant, Iowa, and Lafayette Counties and researchers from USDA, USGS, and WGNHS, with

additional funding from Lafayette Ag Stewardship Alliance and the Iowa County Uplands Watershed Group.

Table 3. List of pathogens and microorganisms tested to identify contamination source. Of these, only organisms we detected are included in Table 2.

Pathogens

Pathogen type

Microorganism

Cryptosporidium hominis

Human adenovirus groups A-F

Only found in humans

Human enterovirus

Human polyomavirus

Norovirus genogroup I

Campylobacter jejuni

Cryptosporidium parvum

Cryptosporidium species

Giardia lamblia group B

Hepatitis E virus

Norovirus genogroup II

Found in humans or livestock

Pathogenic E. coli

Rotavirus group A (NSP3 gene)

Rotavirus group A (viral protein gene)

Rotavirus group C

Salmonella (invA gene)

Salmonella (ttr gene)

Shiga toxin1-producing bacteria

Shiga toxin2-producing bacteria

Microbial source tracking

Contamination source

Microorganism

Human wastewater

Bacteroidales-like Hum M2

Human Bacteroides

Bacteroidales-like cow M2

Bacteroidales-like cow M3

Bovine manure

Bovine adenovirus

Bovine enterovirus

Bovine polyomavirus

Ruminant Bacteroides

Pig-1-Bacteroidales

Porcine manure

Pig-2-Bacteroidales

Porcine adenovirus

Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus


New Cases Identified in Investigation of Lung Disease Among Teens and Young Adults Who Reported Vaping


New Cases Identified in Investigation of Lung Disease Among Teens and Young Adults Who Reported Vaping

 DHS urges Wisconsinites to avoid vaping and e-cigarettes

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (DHS) has received 11 cases of teenagers and young adults hospitalized with severe lung disease that has been linked to recent vaping. Seven other cases are under further investigation. Counties with confirmed cases include Door, Racine, Walworth, Dodge, Waukesha, and Winnebago.

“We are currently interviewing patients, all of whom reported recent vaping. Our disease investigators continue to gather information about the names and types of vape products that were used in hopes of determining a common link,” said Department of Health Services Secretary-designee Andrea Palm.

View the entire news release.


Stay safe during this heat wave


Iowa County — High temperatures are expected over much of Wisconsin during the next week, and the Iowa County Health Department is reminding residents to take steps to stay cool during this heat wave.

“Hot temperatures and humidity can be dangerous and even deadly,” said Sue Matye, Health Officer/Director for the Iowa County Health Department. “During this heat wave, it’s important to stay cool, hydrated, and informed.”

Follow these tips to stay safe during extreme heat:

  • Stay in air conditioning. When possible, stay in air conditioning on hot days. If you don’t have air conditioning, head to libraries, malls, and other public spaces to keep cool.
  • Check on loved ones. Be sure to check on older friends and neighbors who live alone and don’t have air conditioning.
  • Avoid the hottest part of the day. If you have to be outside, stick to the cooler morning and evening hours. Wear light, loose clothing and take frequent, air conditioned breaks.
  • Beware of hot cars. Never leave a person or a pet in a parked car, even for a short time. On an 80 degree day, the temperature inside a car can reach 100 degrees in less than 10 minutes.
  • Stay hydrated. Drink plenty of water on hot days. Avoid alcohol and hot, heavy meals.
  • Stay informed. Watch your local weather forecasts so you can plan outdoor activities safely. Pay attention to any extreme heat alerts.
  • Remember that anyone can get sick from the heat. In Wisconsin, people ages 15-34 are the most likely to report to the ER for getting sick from the heat. No matter your age or how healthy you are, it’s important to stay cool, hydrated, and informed on hot days.

 

If you start feeling overheated, weak, dizzy, nauseated, or have muscle cramps, you could be experiencing heat illness. Move to air conditioning, drink water, get under a fan, and put on cool washcloths. If your symptoms worsen or don’t improve, go to the emergency room.

For more information, visit the Wisconsin Department of Health Services’ heat safety webpage and watch their heat safety video.


VA extends Agent Orange presumption to "Blue Water Navy" Veterans


VA extends Agent Orange presumption to ‘Blue Water Navy’ Veterans 
Eligible Veterans may now be entitled to disability compensation benefits 
WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is preparing to process Agent Orange exposure claims for “Blue Water Navy” Veterans who served offshore of the Republic of Vietnam between Jan. 9, 1962, and May 7, 1975. 
These Veterans may be eligible for presumption of herbicide exposure through Public Law 116-23, Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act of 2019, which was signed into law June 25, 2019, and goes into effect Jan. 1, 2020. They may also qualify for a presumption of service connection if they have a disease that is recognized as being associated with herbicide exposure. 
The bipartisan Blue Water Navy Vietnam Veterans Act gives VA until Jan. 1, 2020, to begin deciding Blue Water Navy related claims. By staying claims decisions until that date, VA is complying with the law that Congress wrote and passed.  
“VA is dedicated to ensuring that all Veterans receive the benefits they have earned,” said VA Secretary Robert Wilkie. “We are working to ensure that we have the proper resources in place to meet the needs of our Blue Water Veteran community and minimize the impact on all Veterans filing for disability compensation.” 
Blue Water Navy Veterans are encouraged to submit disability compensation claims for conditions presumed to be related to Agent Orange exposure. Veterans over age 85 or with life-threatening illnesses will have priority in claims processing.  
Veterans who previously were denied for an Agent Orange related presumptive condition can file a new claim based on the change in law. Eligible survivors of deceased Blue Water Navy Veterans also may benefit from the new law and may file claims for benefits based on the Veterans’ service. 
The new law affects Veterans who served on a vessel operating not more than 12 nautical miles seaward from the demarcation line of the waters of Vietnam and Cambodia, as defined in Public Law 116-23. An estimated 420,000 to 560,000 Vietnam-era Veterans may be considered Blue Water Navy Veterans.  
To qualify, under the new law, these Veterans must have a disease associated with herbicide exposure, as listed in 38 Code of Federal Regulations section 3.309(e).  
Agent Orange presumptive conditions are: 

•    AL amyloidosis
•    Chloracne or similar acneform disease
•    Chronic B-cell leukemias
•    Diabetes mellitus Type 2
•    Hodgkin lymphoma, formerly known as Hodgkin’s disease
•    Ischemic heart disease
•    Multiple myeloma
•    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, formerly known as Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma
•    Parkinson’s disease
•    Peripheral neuropathy, early-onset
•    Porphyria cutanea tarda
•    Prostate cancer
•    Respiratory cancers (lung, bronchus, larynx or trachea)

Soft-tissue sarcoma (other than osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, Kaposi's sarcoma or mesothelioma). 
For more information about Agent Orange exposure in Vietnam waters (Blue Water Navy Veterans), visit https://www.va.gov/disability/eligibility/hazardous-materials-exposure/agent-orange/vietnam-waters/. The updated web links will be live at 4 p.m. EST. Please disregard the content prior to the update. 
Veterans seeking more information should contact their Veterans Service Officer, call VA’s toll-free number at 800-827-1000 or visit the VA Blue Water Navy Agent Orange website.  


Postponed Tax Notice


TAX NOTICE

ARE YOUR PROPERTY TAXES PAID?????

 

July 31st is the last day on which to pay your POSTPONED real estate tax without interest & penalty.

Any real estate taxes remaining unpaid after AUGUST 1st will bear interest & penalty from FEBRUARY 1ST, at 1.5% per month until paid.

For your convenience we have a night deposit box located by the north entrance to the annex building (facing Chapel Street).  Payments can be dropped off before 8:30 a.m. and after 4:30 p.m.  NO CASH PLEASE!

WE WOULD APPRECIATE PAYMENTS BY MAIL OR DROP BOX TO HELP ALLEVIATE WAITING IN LINE FOR RECEIPTS.

Please include the payment stub from the bottom of your tax bill that has your NAME, the TOWNSHIP, VILLAGE OR CITY and PARCEL NUMBER.  Please include a phone number where you can be reached if we have any questions on your payment.  Also make sure your check is made payable to the IOWA COUNTY TREASURER AND IS POSTMARKED NO LATER THAN JULY 31ST.

          PLEASE ENCLOSE A SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE

                                                 FOR RETURN RECEIPT

Pay your property taxes by credit card, debit or electronic check

BY PHONE AT: 1-888-891-6064 You will need your parcel number(s) (i.e.216 0049.A) and the amount owed.

ONLINE AT:  www.iowacounty.org under Department, Treasurer, click on: Pay Taxes Online.  Enter your first and last name and select the parcels and amount you are paying.

FEES:

Credit Card/MC Debit Card:  2.39% of the total payment (i.e.-$1000.00 x 2.39% = $ 23.90)

Visa Debit Card:  Flat fee of $ 3.95

E-Check:  Flat fee of $ 1.50 up to $ 10,000.00 in taxes.

                  Flat fee of $ 10.00 anything over $ 10,000.00

FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE – CALL 1-888-891-6064. OPTION 2

  We would appreciate early walk-in payments to avoid a last minute rush. Office hours are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Friday.

CONNIE JOHNSON

IOWA COUNTY TREASURER

Updated on 7/5/2018


Highway Department - Road Closure Updates


Road Closure information on STH 191 Dodgeville to Hollandale and STH 39 Hollandale to the East county line.

  • STH 39 is open (but work, conducted under flagging operations, remains)
  • Stage 2 started Monday, 5/20 and STH 191 is now officially closed
  • C-25-57 construction has begun (and has a hard closure located between S Clay Hill Rd and Black Oak Rd)
  • 36” RCP and assoc. storm sewer work has started at CTH Z.  STH 191 has a hard closure just east of CTH Z today and tomorrow.  We plan to open it each night.

 Looking ahead:

  • C-25-57 hard closure will remain until mid-June
  • CTH Z work will continue through this week but be open for local traffic over the holiday weekend
  • Next week we are shooting to wrap up all remaining work on STH 39 (ditching, restoration, signing)
  • The hard closure at C-25-58 (precast box culvert) located between CTH BB and Spring Valley Rd has been pushed back a week and will occur the week of June 3rd. The road will be reopened before that weekend.
  • STH 191 detour via STH 23 & STH 39 remains through late August

Highway Department - STH 39/191 Closures


  • STH 39 between Dane County line and Hollandale  to open to traffic this Friday (5-17-2019) evening. 
  • STH 191 closure starts Monday, 5/20/2019 west of Black Oak Road (C-25-57), and just east of CTH Z near Gollon Bait (36” RCP). 
  • STH 191 between CTH BB and Spring Rd (Tom’s campground) closure will start on 5/28.

SWIGG Press Release - Land Conservation


Please review the following press release from the Southwest Wisconsin Groundwater and Geology Study regarding the groundwater study and well samples:

SWIGG Press Release


Health Department - Outbreak of E. coli linked to Romaine Lettuce


  • Consumers who have any type of romaine lettuce in their home should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick. 
    • This advice includes all types or uses of romaine lettuce, such as whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and bags and boxes of precut lettuce and salad mixes that contain romaine, including baby romaine, spring mix, and Caesar salad.
    • If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine or whether a salad mix contains romaine, do not eat it and throw it away.
    • Wash and sanitize drawers or shelves in refrigerators where romaine was stored. Follow these five steps to clean your refrigerator.

      For more information visit the CDC website: https://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/2018/o157h7-11-18/index.html


DHS Wants Wisconsin to Avoid a Serious, Deadly Flu Season This Year



Health Department - West Nile Virus Confirmed Case


Please refer to this document to find out more information regarding West Nile Virus in Iowa County: First Human Case - 2018


Health Department - West Nile Virus PSA


Please review the following safety information: West Nile Virus